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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the new militancy of 1963 changed america and inspired the world. but the promise -- the promise of democracy has not been made real for all of us. the promise is not real for people who work hard and play by the rules every single day, struggling to pay their bills. the promise is not real for retirees who work hard all their lives but don't know how they will make it day to day. the promise is not real for students who graduate under so much debt they wonder if they will ever climb out of it. and the promise is not real for all of us if it is not real for all of us it is not real for any of us. so we are here to replenish our spirit, restore our faith, and renew our activism. today we march for a nation where workers have decent pay, good benefits and rights on a job that no one can steal. today we march for a nation where the golden years of retirement are spent in peace, not in poverty. today we march for a nation where our children, no matter what they look like, where they live, or what they wear, can walk our streets in freedom and not in fear. today we march for a nation
, and dealing with assistance to those in america, the richest country on the face of the earth, who are going hungry, a large number of whom are children who live in america. the committee on agriculture passed out a bipartisan bill in the last congress and it was never brought before my republican friends. this year the committee also passed out a bipartisan bill that was brought to this floor. it could have and should have been passed with a bipartisan vote. not because i agreed with all of it, but because it was appropriate to have a bill to go to conference with on this important subject. our republican friends added three amendments which we harmful to clearly those in need in america. as a result, we didn't vote for it, but that's not why it failed, mr. speaker. it failed because 62 republicans voted against the bill reported out with every republican voting in committee for it. one was mr. lucas, the chairman of the committee observed, it apparently wasn't good enough for those 62 republicans. compromise seems very difficult for some people in this house. but i again remind us all it
mayoral candidate and the man who will be paying for the braces on the teeth of america's comedians, anthony weiner. first, something more important. your right to vote. after months on the political sidelines, mrs. clinton took up the fight yesterday, condemning the supreme court's recent position to gut the voter's rights act and the string of red states rushing to aid in its demise. yesterday, north carolina joined texas, mississippi and alabama in passing strict voter i.d. requirements, a move mrs. clinton says will usher in the old demons of discrimination. >> in 2013, so far, more than 80 bills restricting voting rights have been introduced in 31 states. now, not every obstacle is related to race but everyone who says that racial crimination is no longer a problem in american elections must not be paying attention. >> john: the speech delivered before the american bar association, the first of a series of addresses mrs. clinton plans to give this fall, each one addressing a challenge she says is undermining america's faith in government. well, hey, why wait? i'm sure she's jus
praised essential new book "collision 2012", obama versus romney and the future of elections in america. he joins us now from washington, d.c. dan, what a pleasure. thank you so much for being here on "viewpoint." >> john, thank you. >> john: congratulations to all of the acclaim your book has received. as you know, this weekend in iowa, both santorum and cruz criticized the romney campaign for its use of the catchphrase "you did build that." their argument it was another instance of him cozying up to the rich republicans. was that mitt romney's core problem as you see it? >> well, it was certainly a problem, john, in this respect. governor romney and president obama look at the economy from two totally different perspectives. their life experiences push them in different directions. when governor romney talked about the economy, he often talked about it from the perspective of job creators, whether small business people or larger business owners. he did not talk about the economy in terms of the working people. the people who were working in those factories or in the small businesses.
, but john tyler's views were consistent. letitia was different. >> here is 1840 view of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control le
that is the case for a higher wage. what is the case against. >> only in america can our politicians bemoan a livable wage for getting alot of folks would be grateful for any wage. >> people are not in poverty because they are making minimum wage. >> what we are talking about is rewarding mediocrity. >> the first step on the lad certificate not to be comfortable. you're not supposed to be hanging out there. so you double the salary, you turn that rung into a hammock. >> exactly. you remove the incentive. if you raise the minimum wage, people will never stop working in the fast-food industry. they'll get so comfortable in those hot kitchens and in their acrylic uniforms, relaxing in that grease fog selling like processed meat no matter how many showers they take. of course-- (cheers and applause) >> it's luxury. it's luxury. that's his point. kind of. of course he's also going to be business for the same stupid stuff on television industry. well, not some of an industry as a company. but when you think about it-- when you think about it, if you think abouting it, they actually work very much
exposure to europe, china, latin america. you know i think europe and china are turning, one of the reasons why the euro is so strong for europe term. as for latin america, bud's business has been held back by the weakness in brazil. i know brazil's troubled, but i don't think that weakness is going to last. the world cup comes to brazil in 2014 followed by the olympics in 2016. i think you're going to believe those are going to be pretty darn good for beer sales. bud sells for 17.4 times next year's earnings estimates, gets fair priced considering all the good things going this company's way. although, of course, obviously like everybody else, like it on a pullback. here's one. this is what the crowd drinks in summit, molson coors, tap, i see it similar to bud but with less international exposure and a stock run up further. specifically 18% year-to-date. that's why i'm saying that bud has more room to run because it's well behind this one. and certainly well behind this one, although, this one is an up and comer. suppose you want something stronger than beer, though, then the pick is very
standards that are in little of informational texts. america is seeing two paths. choice or centralized education by the common core national standards. we have a choice to make. are we going to be a self- governing society or are a -- or society governed by despotism. a portion of one of the many education related events during c-span cost -- c-span's town hall program. we invite you to join the conversation. it starts tonight, 7:30 p.m. eastern time >> tonight on "first ladies." sofrances cleveland is popular. people are imitating her hairstyle. of her for piece themselves. we have always hurt as if we if we owned the first lady peered pictures of the first lady lady became extremely popular. you could purchase your own picture to have in your home. she is used in campaigns. we also have ms. cleveland running for first lady. >> the encore presentation of "first ladies" continues tonight at 9:00 eastern leading up to our live event at 11:00 this morning with the help secretary, we will hear about health care from vic morris, the former linton white house adviser. he speaks for about 25
today for different reason. we had the same in latin america. people my grated to vens with a lay from countries such as peru on a consistent basis for half a century. it's a wealthier country than venezuela. look at it this way as well. chinese immigration in the united states has played a key role in the growing economic prosperity of china, they have not only of course been able to export stuff and import stuff to them. they invested in china response i think that borders and barriers are really art initial term of the impact on the economy. we all benefit from the constant circulation as people. the same is happening in europe. some of the eastern -- or central european countries have been -- in the last few years. it became legal to do so. and yet they have been becoming more and more prosperous. poland is more prosperous. it export the an incredible amount of people to spain. >> i have some small things to add. he's 100% right. about the german 1848ers. they left behind complained about the liberals leaving. americans who experienced and met them complained about the autocratic g
. it is a struggle of a lifetime. to redeem the soul of america. we still need to find a way to humanize our political institution, our businesses, and our system of education. 50 years later, those of us educated to the full -- calls of justice, need to appease ourselves. our struggle is an ongoing struggle. there will be progress. there will also be setbacks. we must continue to have hope and be still in our faith that this nation will become a truly multiracial democracy. we must continue to work. we must not give up or give in. keep the faith. and people hurting and suffering, we must be ready to take action, cast our votes, and move our feet. we must have a sense of urgency to use the power rented us to help end human suffering. we as a people and a congress understand our differences do not divide us. we will be at our best when we accept that we are one people, one american family, that we all live in the same house. the american house, the world house. understand that no one, but no one, is breathless. everyone can make a contribution. the march on washington is saying to us today th
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
there are 40 million muslims in america? these images that's we see of burning vehicles, they will be everyday. host: ok, to a for the call. this is from marie -- obama got us into this debacle in egypt prompting me muslim brotherhood. there is this headline, the journalists among the dead in egypt, including the husband and a former "post" reporter who was killed. more details on mick deane, who was killed in cairo. a statement from the british prime minister david cameron who paid tribute to the reporter on twitter -- i am sad to hear the death of cameraman mick deane. my thoughts are with his family and a sky news team. my next call is rich from fairfax, virginia. republican, good morning. caller: thank you for taking my call. i was disgusted last night was watching the news, and i saw a caterpillar bulldozer into their where thesehe area people were. that equipment i'm sure was bought with money the united states gave the egyptian army. i just think of how that equipment is used in this country, to build things, and we are over there destroying stuff. it just makes me sick. we need to stop
reporters discuss their book "whitey bulger: america's most wanted gangster and the man hunt that brought him to justice." , the trialgan -- began june 12, 2013. [applause] >> thank you for coming out on such a beautiful day. we don't get a lot of those here. i'm with the chicago tribune, write a business column with kevin and shelly murphy of the boston globe who are here not to do scouting on the chicago black hawks. [laughter] but to talk about their new book on whitey bulger, the boston mobster caught on the lamb after, what, 16 years, and first of all, let's get -- you guys have been boston journalists for quite a long time at this point. >> somebody said between us it's, like, what, 16 years? yeah, we've been chasing him combined total for 25 -- i mean, 25 each, so 50 between us. >> wow. i was reminded in the beginning, when i was a kid, my father was taking a friend of mine to go see butch cassidy and the sun dance kid. he said, you know, remember, whatever the movie makes of them, they are the bad guys, and the other thing that it reminded me of was the old line from mel brooke in
is america's biggest foreign policy head ache right now. president obama and his security team met yesterday to decide how to respond. >> abc's global affairs correspondent martha raddatz traveled to cairo for an exclusive interview with the man at center of the crisis there. >> he is one of the most powerful men in egypt right now, a civilian leader behind the military's brutal crackdown on its own people. >> no country will allow to have a paramilitary people taking to the streets, preventing simple inhabitants in the neighborhood not able to go out. >> reporter: they were killed for doing that. >> we didn't provoke it. we asked them to go freely. we started by throwing only tear gas and they answered back by firing. >> reporter: the result, more than 1,000 egyptians dead. most of them for protesting the military seizing power. you do not believe egyptian security forces used excessive force at all? >> i cannot say that all of the police are peaceful. of course, there are some exceptions. i cannot say 100%. but i am sure that by and large they try to abide. >> reporter: so no remorse for w
for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's exactly right. what's happened is, the united states is perceived as, first of all, tenuous about making decisions. we had what happened in egypt, for example, the administration was really i think very slow and has still been slow to understand the muslim brotherhood was not democratic. we had the president drawing lines
to working on that and have an immigration bill that will really work for iowa and for america. [applause] .. >> businesses get it and now how important it is for the vitality of america and endorsed by the afl-cio, so labor understands it also. we thank both labor and business community for supporting the immigration bill. [applause] so, nick, you've been involved in ufcw, packing house workers and stuff, and it's been my experience as i toured them, and i didn't work in them like durbin did. he was a meat cutter in packing houses, but as i've traveled around, i see more and more of the latino community working in our packing houses and meat cutting places you represent. tell us about that. >> i'm with local cw222 from northwest iowa. we have a packing house in cherokee, iowa, and dakota city, nebraska. too-- together, that's roughly close to 5,000 employee, and 75% of them are latino. >> 75%? >> yes, yes, so 75% of the membership who we represent are latino and immigrant workers, so, again, good morning, ladies and gentlemen, of the panel and audience, senators, i'm honored to be here t
in that he believed that business in america should serve some point. there should be an and the business. it didn't message you have to have a broad social and that there should be some point to it, which automatically testing wishes and for most of our business folks from today. he had kind of an enlightened sense of what this is journalism could be about. >> he didn't mind criticism of business. >> that's right. let's face it, when it's 1933 and its 1934, it's kind of hard to defend business. he had a henry hoover conception of heroic business, but in the early part of the depression it was almost impossible for any honest person to continue to take that line. so fortune and its writers including agee begin to confront some of the more unseemly side of the country. so fortune ran pieces about -- they ran a piece about the tennessee valley authority, which agee wrote and which luce told him was told there was one of the best things i've ever been printed since fortune had been around. so they were brought and pragmatically open to new deal reforms. and i keep mentioning dwight macdonald
. >> is it likely? >> i don't know the answer to that unfortunately because law enforcement management in america at the federal level is a disaster. >> do you agree with that, mitch? that's a pretty big statement. >> those are strong words for somebody who used to be a u.s. attorney. he outranks me. i'm not going to try to take that one out. >> you must be right. possible certainly isn't a lot of support for the federal prosecutions that we have in this country. >> i have great respect for the agents and the u.s. attorneys around the country who do a very difficult job. i was a u.s. attorney, i was an independent counsel. i've had a lot of experience. but i'm going to tell you something, federal government has gotten too big, federal law enforcement agencies have gotten too big. they are manageable. nobody know what is they're doing. look at the latest story about how the dea is providing information to the nsa interc t intercepts and are being told to lie to federal judges about it. you cannot have law enforcement functioning where they are told it's okay to lie to a federal judge about how a
and how we can bring our a game to the table every day to serve america's communities that have many times too little access to health care. so i wanted to welcome you all to the room and welcome senator ben cardin to the room who is no stranger to baltimore medical since and has been around i got here, and that is like 300 years ago. senator was at the very beginning of a great assist to baltimore medical system when we had our help waiver. we had a medicare demonstration project for many years, and every time it looked like it was going to end or expire come -- the senator could be counted on to not only sure it will be realistic but to renew the effort to make sure that happened. when we wanted to build a brand- new building, he was the first one i came to see. which started the conversation when he was on one side of the hill and ended the conversation on the other side of the hill because it took that long for us to get the job done but the senator was responsible for the first public money coming into this venture that eventually grew into the building you were all sitting in now. fo
, massachusetts. the town is number one on "money" magazine's new best small towns in america list for weathering the recession well and having a big lake and being close to both boston and providence. so close that you can commute to work in either city. it is also diverse. nine churches, seven synagogues and one of the largest mosques in new england. louisville, colorado, and vienna, virginia, round out the top three. >> bill: never heard of that city in massachusetts. nine churches in a town of 17,000? congregations are rather small, i would say because some people do not go to church at any rate. what we have -- very significant yesterday. there are two unrelated decisions regarding -- related to law enforcement that really were related. they weren't planned that way but they really do fit together and say something very important, i think, about law enforcement in this country. a lot of us have said for a long time that we went way overboard, you know. 10, 20 years ago. the last -- the previous generation about -- gotta be tough on crime. tough on law enforcement. crack down on crime. throw
intervention. it believes the rebels will not support america's interest if they were to come to power now. this came out to a letter that general dempsey sent. he said the military is clearly taking out the syrian air force and shifting the balance. michigan republican congressman justin amash held a town hall meeting recently in michigan. he touched on topics like health care and government surveillance. he offered an amendment that would bar the and as a from collecting phone and data records from citizens who are not subject of investigation. the amendment was opposed by speaker john boehner and the white house and ultimately defeated. his town hall back in michigan lasted about one hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> hello, everyone. ben, he is my chief of staff. he does not just work for me. he is primarily in our grand rapids office, and you can find that on my website, and we have a satellite office in battle creek, so if there is something you would like to schedule, you can contact our grand rapids office, and we will make sure we will have someone to meet with you as well. jordan
, to restore that shining city on a hill that is the united states of america. thank you and god bless you. [applause] >> thank you so much. first of all, i want to say i learned something new tonight. here in new hampshire, we say thank you all. in texas, they think all you all. is that more thank you or more people? >> technically speaking, all y'a ll is the plural of y'all. that was ronald reagan reminded us that freedom is only one generation away from extension. if we do not engage now in the freedom, we will want -- we will one day be telling our children what it is like to be free. i need to repair and oversight. we have another candidate. i know there is nobody here who wants to see custer win another term in the united states house. we know we have a potential candidate and former senator gary lambert. he is with us tonight. i hope you get a chance to say hello to him as well. now, our host, i do so much. >> hey, did we have a speaker tonight. joseph and i -- you turn down the heat to much. we would like to ask -- invite you all to have some coffee in the back. there is wonderful
by french revolutionaries and the a were influencing people in america. there were rumors that cities would be burned. it was terrorism they were anticipating. for example, the opposition party, the democratic republican party was very enthusiastic about the french and some of the ideals of the french revolution. >> jefferson in particular. >> this is where they begin to go in different directions. also, some of the press is very vehement in their criticism of the administration. so they muzzled the press and said that this is probably the thing that john adams is most criticized for. abigail, i believe, supported john. abigail was even more vehement during i think she is even more conservative than john during that time. >> the upshot of this, the people who were breaking the alien and sedition acts -- >> you could be jailed. >> it was said that the press made things up. he had no standards. it was not the they were supporting the french, but they were making up stories that were not the truth europe adams was very seriously worried about this. jefferson -- that were not the truth. adams w
at the time and what it was like to be america's first lady and not just the wife of an american mr. an american minister, but to be a wife and a daughter. >> the thing that i always think about with abigail is the relationship, the partnership. without abigail, there is no john. without john, there is no abigail.>> john is important to history. >> yes. with the support she provided to him in europe, in the presidency, in the vice presidency, she was so trustworthy that she could to -- take care of things. so he could go off and be this great public person, which was exactly what she wanted.>> to our guests, our thanks for helping us understand more about the life and legacy of america's second first lady abigail adams. thank you for your time. >> thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> wednesday night, we continue our encore of the first season ladies," with dolly madison. , september 9, a look at the life of edith roosevelt. our website has a special section on the first ladies, including "welco
of the things we should take away from those statistics, that snapshot of america? >> one of the things is there is an expansion going on. this is one of the things that is very difficult for the adamses because politics are changing, and the changing politics means they are new englanders. they are federalists. as time goes by, as the population moved south and westward, it makes it more difficult for politics that they believe in. >> we are going to invite your telephone calls. we will be going to calls in just a few minutes. i am told you want to read us a passage from one of the letters. >> i would like to remark on the 39-year life span. that is not exactly accurate to the extent that children died much more rapidly. if a child survived to 12, probably the life span was much longer. many, many people lived into their 70's, as the adamses did. >> the five children -- how many of them survived to adulthood? >> four. >> four? you are getting a passage ready for us. you wanted to read us from the letter we talked about earlier, "remember the ladies"? >> right. in this particular letter
. this is true as much of the recent past, as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy, as i learned this time around. first, there are people you have to talk to. [laughter] and while i was blessed from beginning to end from having some passing people to talk to you about joe kennedy, including large numbers of kennedys, i must prefer working from written documents to listen to people talk and try to figure out what's real, what's imagined what they know, what they think they know because someone told them for what they think they know but they don't know at all. the other difficulty about writing about our recent past is that it's not always easy to establish one's distance from it. to construct passion of the past that is so close to us, and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our commonsense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demystify them to move beyond the clichÉd about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of our forefathers. esp
when many of us deployed to central america on humanitarian missions -- all of the skill sets paid us benefits in the 90s and 2000. how do we want to have that dynamic training that will keep people in the guard? we are really pushing this hard right now. we have to have the opportunity to fill vacancies. whether it is a critical chart or a chart fall for two or three years. some of you remember the keep up program, where folks can get away from an employer. the family situation is right. they can go close to an active duty bill, especially to the joint world. to focushat we ought on. it starts with getting the active component, the reserve component, structured right for the future. -- he is heading to the marine forces commander reserve. commanding general of our larger organization. first marine general to command nato forces, general mills. >> as a new one on the panel i will say that i came to work with the reserve component with the greatest respect the cousin twice on the battlefield both in iraq and at -- in iraq and afghanistan. one of the biggest challenges is maintaining th
: every day more americans choose abc news, america's number one n it makes me feel happy and excited because i have a mentor in my life. it makes me feel good because i know i am helping someone. the first time i seen her smile, i knew it was gonna be a better year and a better day. she has changed my life, now i can be whatever i want to. she taught me never to give up, and i never will. mentoring works, become a mentor. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- moral obscenity. that's what the secretary of state is calling syria's alleged use of deadly chemical weapons. could the u.s. be on the brink of taking military action? >> fierce fire fight. monstrous storm of flames burning to yosemite national forest. the race to stop the fire from destroying ancient trees and polluting drinking water supplies. >> we never know the way the fires come up around here when they're going to overtake you. so safety first. >> a progress report as 4,000 homes and businesses are in harm's way. >> then watch out increased risk of walking while texting and talking on the phone. a killer combination. >
desire is not to get america into a third middle eastern conflict. but he had gone out and said himself that if the syrian regime used chemical weapons that would be considered a red line. once he put himself out there, i think it was difficult for him given the gravity of this attack, a truly horrendous attack with chemical weapons for him to do nothing. >> ironically, quick take, does russia saying don't do this help the chances that it doesn't have to be a military response? >> no, but my guess would be we're trying to send a message to the russian this is is going to be a limited strike. we're not trying to overthrow assad and that will lead their response to not be that severe. >> peter beinart thank you for the insight. >>> let's turn to dangerous weather at home, the fierce wildfire burning in and around yosemite national park showing no signs of letting up and it's threatening san francisco's water supply and power grid. the rim fire burned through almost 161,000 acres so far, the 13th largest wildfire inle kaical history. cnn's nick valencia is live in groveland, california, tr
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)